Time taken to receive angioplasty (PCI) during a heart attack

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), commonly known as angioplasty, is a procedure used to treat patients with diseased (narrowed or blocked) arteries in the heart. Arteries in the heart are also known as the coronary arteries. PCI is performed to widen the diseased coronary arteries to allow blood to flow more freely through the heart alleviating chest pain (angina) and/or minimizing heart muscle damage during an acute heart attack. PCI is also referred to as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Early intervention with PCI can save lives and preserve heart muscle and function. The sooner the PCI is done, the better the chance of survival. A high percentage of heart attack patients who receive PCI within 90 minutes of their arrival at the hospital while having a heart attack may indicate that a hospital provides a higher level of care.

About this measure

This measure tracks the percentage of heart attack patients who receive PCI within 90 minutes of their arrival at the hospital while having a heart attack. The second graph shows the trend over time for this measure.

Note: In this case, a higher number is better.  

Most Recent Available Data (Percent)
  2013 Q1
Northwestern Memorial 98
National Average 95
State Average 97
Performance Trend (Percent)
  2011 Q2 2011 Q3 2011 Q4 2012 Q1 2012 Q2 2012 Q3 2012 Q4 2013 Q1
Northwestern Memorial 98 97 97 97 98 97 98 98
National Average 93 93 94 94 95 95 95 95
State Average 94 94 94 95 95 96 96 97
Source:U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov
AMI-8a Primary PCI Received within 90 Minutes of Hospital Arrival for AMI